Dedicated Vet Travels Four Hours to Save 128 Critically Ill, Flood-Stranded Dogs!

caring for sick dogs

The situation is dire. Six dogs are close to crossing the Rainbow Bridge.
Some are going into shock and many are so dehydrated they’re unable to eat.

There are dozens!

Six dogs are close to crossing the Rainbow Bridge. One dies before he gets there. Some are going into shock and many are so dehydrated they’re unable to eat, drink or walk. At least a dozen of the dogs are critical.

Veterinarian Nick Moore prepares to enter Hi Tower Kennels, which appealed for help as it was surrounded by floodwaters and the number of rescued dogs there grew. Moore drove down from north of Austin. Photo: Photo For The Washington Post By Lucian Perkins / Lucian Perkins

Veterinarian Nick Moore prepares to enter Hi Tower Kennels,
which appealed for help as it was surrounded by floodwaters and the number of rescued dogs there grew.
Image Credit: Chron via The Washington Post By Lucian Perkins

This is the desperate scene that greets veterinarian Nick Moore, 38, when he opens the door to the hot, dark, partly flooded rooms of the low-lying, run-down house that has been converted into Hi Tower Kennels.

The mobile equine veterinarian has traveled four hours with a friend and a truck loaded with veterinary supplies to Beaumont, Texas from his home in Georgetown, just north of Austin, to help out in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

The crisis along the flooded Texas-Louisiana border includes thousands of submerged homes across miles of rural East Texas and thousands of people in need of rescue.

“Helping animals is what I do…How could I not come?” says Moore.

Hi Tower Kennel floods the night before Moore arrives–the last straw in a critical situation. Moore has his work before him–a total of 128 dogs, 16 cats and a horse in dire need of his expertise.

caring for sick dogs

Volunteer Chris Percious helps care for sick dogs
at the Hi Tower Kennels in Beaumont, Texas,
Image Credit: Chron via The Washington Post By Lucian Perkins

When the intense rains began, owner of Hi Tower Kennels Cherry Braum had only 30 dogs in crates and cages. But as the murky flood waters crept up to her doorstep, dozens more dogs came on board, most of them rescues from her neighbor’s property.

Already overtaxed with critical human rescues, there is little the Beaumont police department can do for the dogs, at least a dozen more horses and other animals in the area, So Moore jumps in, picking up the names of those in need from an officer in the animal services division.

This brings Moore, his friend Sam Darlington, 55, and a general contractor to the sweltering, dark kennel. They are now inserting intravenous drips into the dogs who are going into shock. They carry the most critical cases into the front room to be closely monitored.

Administering IV fluids to sick dogs

Sam Darlington, left, helps Moore prepare to hydrate
a very sick dog via an IV at the Hi Tower Kennels.
Image Credit: Chron via The Washington Post By Lucian Perkins

Moore organizes the two young couples who show up to help. They hold the bags of IV fluids and keep a close eye on the dogs' progress. Moore instructs one man to post an urgent request on social media for crates, a truck and a dry place to take all the dogs fast.

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